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CURRENT PAIN RESEARCH STUDIES

ACTIVE PROTOCOLS-CURRENTLY RECRUITING SUBJECTS

ACUPUNCTURE AIM I

"Evaluating the Effect of Acupuncture on Pain Relief Using QST"

IRB Protocol 2009P-001551

The Center is currently recruiting subjects for an IRB-approved study to find out if a new approach to measuring acupuncture therapy is effective. We think one way to test how effective acupuncture therapy is, would be to test how a person responds to heat and cold sensations before and after acupuncture therapy.

The study consists of 3-7 visits, an interview, a brief physical exam, a urine test, two blood draws and sensory testing. The testing (Quantitative Sensory Testing) is noninvasive and involves heat and cold stimulation. Compensation will be provided.

We are recruiting people ages 18-65, who have had radiating neck or back pain for at least two months. Radiating neck or back pain includes, but is not limited to, disk herniation, spinal stenosis or post-laminectomy syndrome.

For further information, please contact us at 617-724-6102 or toll-free at 888-No-2-Ouch
mghpainresearch@partners.org

ACUPUNCTURE AIM III

"Effect of Acupuncture and Pain Medication on Radicular Pain Using QST"

IRB Protocol 2012P-001795

The Center is currently recruiting subjects for an IRB-approved study is to see if people with neck and back pain that spreads to their arms or legs feel improvement while using Gabapentin (pain medication) or while receiving acupuncture. We will compare the acupuncture results to the Gabapentin results.

The study consists of 3-7 visits, an interview, a brief physical exam, a urine test, sensory testing and the daily use of the study medication and placebo. Gabapentin is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved treatment for shingles. The testing (Quantitative Sensory Testing) is noninvasive and involves heat and cold stimulation and is approved by the FDA. Compensation will be provided.

We are recruiting people ages 18-75, who have had radiating neck or back pain for at least two months. Cervical or lumbar radicular pain will include, but is not limited to, such clinical conditions as disk herniation, spinal stenosis, and post-laminectomy syndrome.

For further information, please contact us at 617-724-6102 or toll-free at 888-No-2-Ouch
mghpainresearch@partners.org

ESI-II

"PET/MRI Imaging of Neuraxial Inflammation in Sciatica Patients"

IRB Protocol 2013P-002174

The Center is currently recruiting subjects for an IRB-approved study to see if we can identify areas of inflammation in the spine using a specific type of imaging (PET/MRI).

The study consists of 2-3 visits to the MGH Martinos Center in Charlestown and the MGH Center for Translational Pain Research in Boston and 6 phone calls. Your involvement in the study will be minimum of 1 or a maximum of 12 weeks. Compensation will be provided.

We are recruiting people ages 18-75, currently diagnosed with lower extremity radicular pain, have a clear dermatomal distribution of the painful area extending to the distal lower extremities and reports ongoing pain intensity of 4 or greater using the visual analogue scale (VAS) during the week prior to the enrollment.

For further information, please contact us at 617-724-6102 or toll-free at 888-No-2-Ouch
mghpainresearch@partners.org

GUANFACINE AIM I

"Effect of Guanfacine on Opioid-induced Hyperalgesia (OIH) and Tolerance"

IRB Protocol 2013P-001510

The purpose of this IRB-approved study is to see if the study drug guanfacine, in combination with an opioid medication (morphine), can help reduce pain felt by people with chronic pain and prevent the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Sometimes the opioid medication used to treat chronic pain does not reduce the pain, but it could make the pain feel worse. This is called OIH.

We are currently recruiting people ages 18-65, have chronic neck or back and have not taken opioid, guanfacine (or other alpha-2AR agonists) for at least 6 months. Compensation will be provided.

For further information, please contact us at 617-724-6102 or toll-free at 888-No-2-Ouch
mghpainresearch@partners.org

GUANFACINE AIM II

"Effect of Guanfacine on the Reversal of Opioid-induced Hyperalgesia (OIH) and Tolerance"

IRB Protocol 2014P-001377

The purpose of this IRB-approved study is to see if the study drug, guanfacine, in combination with opioid medication (for example, morphine), can help reduce pain felt by people with chronic pain and reverse the indications of opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Sometimes the opioid medication used to treat chronic pain does not reduce the pain, but it could make the pain feel worse. This is called OIH.

We are currently recruiting people ages 18-65, have chronic neck or back pain and are currently taking an opioid medication to relieve their pain. Compensation will be provided.

For further information, please contact us at 617-724-6102 or toll-free at 888-No-2-Ouch
mghpainresearch@partners.org

RADICULAR PAIN

"Somatosensory Profiling in Radicular Pain Patients and its Correlation With Treatment Outcome"

IRB Protocol 2011P-002234

The Center is currently seeking people with pain in their legs originating from the spine. This IRB-approved study is looking at the pain sensation, threshold, tolerance and the outcome of the treatment given by their own physicians.

The study consists of two visits, an interview, a brief physical exam, a urine test and sensory testing. The testing (Quantitative Sensory Testing) is noninvasive (no needles) and involves heat and cold stimulation. Estimated time of each visit is 2 hours. Compensation will be provided.

The Center is currently recruiting people 18-80, have pain in the legs, which is determined by a physician to originate from the spine, and receiving treatment by a physician.

For further information, please contact us at 617-724-6102 or toll-free at 888-No-2-Ouch
mghpainresearch@partners.org

 

ACTIVE PROTOCOLS-CURRENTLY NOT RECRUITING SUBJECTS

CRPS NERVE PAIN - GRALISE

"Treatment of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome with Once Daily Gastric-Retentive Gabapentin (Gralise)"

IRB Protocol 2012P-000466

The Center is no longer recruiting subjects for this IRB-approved study to find out if Gralise (gastric-retentive gabapentin) will reduce pain and improve function in people with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type I (CRPS I). CRPS I is a neuropathic pain condition that results from damage to the nerves in the peripheral nervous system.   Gralise is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat postherpetic neuralgia (a complication of the disease Shingles, which is caused by the chickenpox virus), but is not approved to treat CRPS I.

For further information, please contact us at 617-724-6102 or toll-free at 888-No-2-Ouch
mghpainresearch@partners.org

KETAMINE

"Effect of Ketamine on Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia"

IRB Protocol 2008P-000879

The Center is no longer recruiting subjects for this IRB-approved study to develop a diagnostic tool to explain why narcotics do not always improve pain.  The study consisted of one to two visits, a brief physical exam, a urine test, an FDA approved drug infusion and sensory testing – a noninvasive test that involves hot and cold stimulation. Potential subjects were 18-65 years old, with chronic pain and taking narcotic pain medication for the last 3 months.

For further information, please contact us at 617-724-6102 or toll-free at 888-No-2-Ouch
mghpainresearch@partners.org

PENNSAID

"Effect of Pennsaid on Clinical Neuropathic Pain"

IRB Protocol 2011P-000897  

The Center is no longer recruiting subjects for this IRB-approved study to see if the drug Pennsaid (Diclofenac) can help reduce pain felt by people with chronic nerve pain. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Pennsaid to treat osteoarthritis (bone pain), but the FDA has not approved Pennsaid to treat neuropathic (nerve) pain.

The research study compared Pennsaid to placebo. Qualified subjects were 18-80 years old and had a diagnosed nerve pain condition for at least 3 months. The study consisted of four study visits over 5 weeks, three phone interviews, a pain diary and medication log, questionnaires, a urine test, a brief physical exam, sensory testing and use of medicated study lotion to be used 2-4 times each day during the study.

For further information, please contact us at 617-724-6102 or toll-free at 888-No-2-Ouch
mghpainresearch@partners.org

QST

“Pain Response in Patients on Long Term Opioid Therapy for Chronic Pain.”

IRB Protocol 2003P-000110

The Center is no longer recruiting subjects for this IRB-approved study to compare pain threshold and tolerance using quantitative sensory testing. 

This study explored the effects of opioids on pain threshold and tolerance. The study was conducted at the MGH Center for Translational Pain Research and included a standardized interview, a non-invasive examination and quantitative sensory testing (QST). QST is non invasive and involves heat and cold stimulation.

For further information, please contact us at 617-724-6102 or toll-free at 888-No-2-Ouch
mghpainresearch@partners.org

SCS

"Effects of Spinal Cord Stimulation on Pain Thresholds and Sensory Perceptions in Chronic Pain Patients"

IRB Protocol 2010P-000425  

The Center is no longer recruiting subjects for this IRB-approved study. The purpose of this study was to better understand how the Spinal Cord Stimulator works in relieving chronic pain. We recruited subjects who had chronic pain and who already had a Spinal Cord Stimulator (SCS) in place.

For further information, please contact us at 617-724-6102 or toll-free at 888-No-2-Ouch
mghpainresearch@partners.org

COMPLETED PROTOCOLS

ULTRAM ER

“Clinical Management of Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia with Tramadol ER”

IRB Protocol 2007P-000025  

This was a research study to see if Ultram ER, an FDA-approved pain medication, would be helpful in providing pain relief in subjects whose chronic pain is not well controlled on narcotic pain medicine. This IRB-approved study consisted of 6 visits over 6 weeks. Study testing included: physical exam, urine testing, questionnaires and non-invasive (no needles) nerve testing using cold/heat sensations.

For further information, please contact us at 617-724-6102 or toll free at 888-NO- 2- OUCH mghpainresearch@partners.org

RAMELTEON

“Clinical Management of Neuropathic Pain with Ramelteon”

IRB Protocol 2008-P-000988

This was an IRB-approved double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover clinical study to examine the hypothesis that ramelteon would reduce pain scores and improve functional status in subjects with neuropathic pain. 

For further information, please contact us at 617-724-6102 or toll free at 888-NO-2-OUCH mghpainresearch@partners.org

CHART REVIEW STUDY

"Pain Relief and Functional Improvement Following Opioid Therapy"

IRB Protocol 2206P-001347

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between opioid therapy and clinical outcomes.  The dose, duration of treatment, and type of opioid were compared to outcomes such as pain reduction, functional improvement, and presence of side effects in chronic pain patients on opioid therapy.  This was a retrospective chart review study only.  Medical records of patients who were seen at Massachusetts General Hospital Pain Center from 1995 on, and who were on opioid therapy, were examined for variables of opioid therapy, and clinical outcomes were recorded.

For further information, please contact us at 617-724-6102 or toll free at 888-NO- 2- OUCH mghpainresearch@partners.org

ACUPUNCTURE AND PAIN MANAGEMENT - A NATIONAL SURVEY

A nation wide survey was conducted to gather information regarding the role of acupuncture in pain management from pain physicians and referral physicians who mange clinical pain conditions. In recent years acupuncture has gained popularity in the United States of America as a modality of complementary and alternative medicine for certain disease entities and clinical conditions including pain. Our results indicate that an overwhelming majority of survey responders have a positive attitude toward using acupuncture as an alternative modality for pain management.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=A+SURVEY+OF+selected+physician's+views+on+acupuncture+in+pain+management

For further information, please contact us at 617-724-6102 or toll free at 888-NO- 2- OUCH mghpainresearch@partners.org

OPIOID THERAPY FOR CHRONIC PAIN: PHYSICIANS' ATTITUDE AND CURRENT PRACTICE PATTERNS - A NATIONAL SURVEY

The authors conducted a comprehensive practice-oriented survey to examine physicians' attitudes, knowledge, experience, and practice patterns regarding opioid therapy for chronic pain management. The survey contained 23 questions divided into six categories: (1) physicians' overall view on opioid therapy for chronic pain management; (2) clinical indications for opioid therapy; (3) patient-related factors influencing the decision to begin opioid therapy; (4) effectiveness of opioid therapy; (5) choice of opioid regimen; and (6) opioid agreement and opioid abuse behavior. The survey results suggest that opioid therapy remains an important treatment option for chronic malignant and nonmalignant pain. However, the survey results should be viewed in the context of a low response rate (18.2 percent). These results also suggest that by improving the clinical knowledge of physicians participating in opioid therapy through education and collaboration, including a team approach with consultation from pain specialists, psychologists, and others, a better outcome for opioid therapy in patients with chronic pain conditions could be achieved.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21957826

For further information, please contact us at 617-724-6102 or toll free at 888-NO- 2- OUCH mghpainresearch@partners.org

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