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Dr. Mao’s Selected Bibliography
 
Dr. Chen ’s Selected Bibliography
Research Interests
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Our Staff

 

 


Jianren Mao, M.D., Ph.D. Director,
MGH Center for Translational Pain Research

Current Challenges in Translational Pain Research

Vice Chair for Research, Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine
Richard J. Kitz Professor of Anesthesia Research, Harvard Medical School

Dr. Mao is a Board Certified Anesthesiologist and Pain Medicine Specialist.  He received his MD degree from Suzhou Medical College in 1983.  He received a PhD degree in neuroscience from the Medical College of Virginia in 1992.  His anesthesia residency was completed at the Medical College of Virginia in 1999, and pain management fellowship at the Massachusetts General Hospital in 2000. 

Dr. Mao has been the Principal Investigator of eight RO1 and one P20 grants awarded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), four industry-sponsored grants and of several other research grants and clinical research projects.  He also served as co-investigator on NIH RO1 grant and industry-sponsored grant.  In addition to a full research schedule, Dr. Mao sees outpatients in the MGH Pain Center clinic two days per week.

Dr. Mao has been actively involved in both preclinical and clinical pain research, including:

  • neural and molecular mechanisms of neuropathic pain, opioid tolerance and dependence
  • interactions between the cellular mechanisms of neuropathic pain and opioid tolerance
  • opioid-induced pain sensitivity and its clinical implications
  • role of cannabinoids in the modulation of neuropathic pain
  • role of central glucocorticoid receptors in the neural and molecular mechanisms of  pain and opioid tolerance
  • mechanisms of comorbid chronic pain.

Dr. Mao serves as a regular reviewer for some thirty professional journals and is on the editorial board of Journal of Pain, Molecular Pain, and Journal of Neuropathic Pain.  He is an associate editor for Pain and a section editor for Pain Medicine and Anesthesia & Analgesia. He also serves as a reviewer for grant-awarding institutes including NIH.  He has authored or co-authored over 200 original articles, book chapters, and abstracts. 

Dr. Mao is a member of the American Society for Neuroscience, the International Association for the Study of Pain, the American Pain Society, and the American Society of Anesthesiologists.  In 1997, he received the Early Career Scholar Award from the American Pain Society, and in 1999, the Academic Achievement Award from the Medical College of Virginia.  He was elected to the Association of University Anesthesiologists in 2005. He is the recipient of the 2012 John J. Bonica Award from the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Management.

Dr. Mao’s Selected Bibliography

Research Interest

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Lucy Chen, M.D., Clinical Investigator

MGH Center for Translational Pain Research

Assistant Anesthetist, Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine
Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School

Dr. Lucy Chen is a Board Certified Anesthesiologist and Pain Medicine Specialist.  She is also trained in acupuncture technique.  With this unique background, Dr. Chen practices both conventional pain medicine and acupuncture treatment for pain in the Massachusetts General Hospital Pain Clinic.

Dr. Chen served as the Director of the MGH Pediatric Pain Service and has been the Director of the MGH Pain Center Resident Education Program and Quality Assurance Committee.

As a lead clinical investigator of the MGH Center for Translational Pain Research, Dr. Chen is particularly passionate about advancing an integrative model of pain management. A critical issue is to create innovative methods to objectively evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment.  As the Principal Investigator of a five-year NIH RO1 grant, Dr. Chen has led the effort to develop novel research tools and innovative clinical paradigms in order to improve the assessment of acupuncture treatment for chronic pain.  Dr. Chen’s other research projects include investigating the effectiveness of acupuncture for chronic pain conditions and understanding the impact of opioid-related disorders on practice of pain medicine.

Dr. Chen also serves as a co-investigator in a number of projects including opioid-induced pain sensitivity (hyperalgesia); somatosensory profiling in radicular pain patients and its correlation with treatment outcome; effect of Pennsaid on clinical neuropathic pain; effect of sustained release gabapentin in neuropathic pain management, etc.

Dr. Chen is an Assistant Professor of Harvard Medical School and teaches medical students, residents, and fellows at the Massachusetts General Hospital.  She has lectured at the regional and national conferences on such topics as non-opioid and opioid treatment of chronic pain; opioid-induced hyperalgesia; pediatric pain management; and acupuncture in pain medicine.

Dr. Chen ’s Selected Bibliography

Research Interest

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Shihab Ahmed, M.D., Clinical Investigator

MGH Center for Translational Pain Research

Assistant in Anesthesia, Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine
Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School

Dr. Ahmed is a board certified Anesthesiologist and Pain Medicine specialist. After completing his anesthesiology and pain training he began his academic career at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Center for Pain Medicine. At the center, he previously served as its Medical Director and Program Director. Currently, he is the Multidisciplinary Pain Service Course Director; and responsible for overseeing the medical students’ clerkships at Pain Center from the Harvard Medical School. At the Pain Center he teaches Pain fellows, residents and medical students the pathophysiology of pain, specific pain syndromes including cancer pain, and advanced interventional pain therapies such as implantation of indwelling devices. 

He is a Clinical Investigator at the MGH Center for Translational Pain Research (CTPR). His current research focuses on the mechanisms of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy for refractory pain and how pain transitions from acute pain to chronic.

Dr. Ahmed's Selected Bibliography

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Yi Zhang, M.D., Ph.D., Clinical Investigator

MGH Center for Translational Pain Research

Assistant in Anesthesia, Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine
Instructor, Harvard Medical School

   
Research Areas

  • Understanding the mechanism of chronic pain
  • Identifying factors that predict response to therapeutic interventions in chronic pain conditions.
  • Developing novel agents for pain relief.

Description of Research
            I am involved in research activities in the MGH Center for Translational Pain Research, led by Dr. Jianren Mao. Currently I am working on utilizing quantitative sensory testing in characterizing sensory profiles in chronic pain conditions including radicular pain, opioid induced hyperalgesia, chronic neuropathic pain, as well as exploring the role of quantitative sensory testing in predicting therapeutic response to pharmacological and interventional management. I am also collaborating with basic scientists in preclinical studies of potential analgesic agents.

Selected Publications

  • Zhang Y, Wood MJ, Gilligan C. Spinal cord stimulation in a patient with spinal epidural lipomatosis. Pain Med. 2011 Mar;12(3):377-81
  • Lim G, Wang S, Zhang Y, Tian Y, Mao J. Spinal leptin contributes to the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain in rodents. J Clin Invest. 2009 Feb;119(2):295-304
  • Zhang Y, Dawson VL, Dawson TM. Parkin: Clinic Aspects and Neurobiology. Clinic Neuroscience, 2001 Aug; 1: 467-82
  • Zhang Y*, Chung KKK*. Lim K, Tanaka Y, et al, (*Equally contributing authors) Parkin Ubiquitinates the alpha-Synuclein-Interacting Protein, Synphilin-1: Implications for Lewy Body Formation in Parkinson’s Disease. Nature Medicine, 2001 Oct; 7(10): 1144-50.
  • Zhang Y, Gao J, Chung KKK, Huang H, Dawson VL, Dawson TM. Parkin functions as an E2-dependent ubiquitin-protein ligase and promotes the degradation of the synaptic vesicle-associated protein, CDCrel-1. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2000 Nov 21; 97(24): 13354-9.

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